A Travellerspoint blog

Schonbrunn & Belvedere Castles und Das Ende

Wed - Sep 18

At 6:30am the sky was blue, the sun was rising and brilliant and the forecast was for it all to go downhill at 8am. Sure enough, it did. Clouds moved in and the only sun and blue sky was in the distance. But they did say that by noon rain chances would be nil, but the clouds would stay and the temperature remain in the low to mid 50's. So we modified our plans and did Schonbrunn Palace in the morning.

Good choice as once we got in, and it was raining, we could see the crowds arriving and by the time we left it was a zoo. We opted for the shorter tour, about an hour. You can buy the Imperial tour that covers about 25 rooms, and other tours that cover more rooms and museums but we were getting museumed out so we opted for the shorter tour.

As usual royalty live like, well, Royalty. Gold on everything. Porcelain and silverware everywhere. And there is no dinner just lying about on the couch watching TV.

Still it was an impressive view into the years before and after World War One, life before electric and modern plumbing, and the decorum of life growing up Royal.

We then went over to the Carriage Museum. This is where they kept the Cadillacs of those time, even if they were pulled by horses. Showy yes, and beautiful works of art, but they also served the purposes of transportation and Royal pomp and circumstance.

We had lunch in their restaurant, walked a bit and took some pictures, even if drizzling while the sun was trying to brighten the sky, and then got the train to our second objective, the Naschmarkt.

The market has existed since 1898 and is known as the place to get exotic foreign foods. We agreed and were it not for baggage allowances and restrictions would have brought home lots of unique fruits, cheese and other munchies. The place runs for about 10 blocks or so and on Saturdays expands into a gigantic flea market. It ends at a major Platz where we hopped another train, then changed to a trolley, and went to the Belvedere Palace, our last destination.

Belvedere is filled with lots of Medieval art, 15C religious stuff, an Impressionist collection as well as a Realist section, and a room devoted to Gustav Klimt, a leader of the Vienna Secession movement. At one point he was accused of creating 'pornographic' art, and now his works hang in museums all over Vienna. We really like his art, most it containing beautiful women in erotic poses.

By now we had had enough. It was getting near 5pm, Karen's cold, while not really bad, still was tiring, though Mike's is much better, so we hopped two trams and ended back at the hotel.

After resting for a bit we decided to just eat at the hotel restaurant since we were both not up for a busy evening and had to pack for our final night in London.

This will be our last blog. We hope you have enjoyed following us as much as we have enjoyed our travels from Germany to Austria. We had only 3 days of rainy weather out of our 18 days so we can't complain. We've thoroughly enjoyed everyplace we've been but are looking forward to getting home and "relaxing"!

Guten Nacht,
Karen & Mike

Schonbrunn Palace

Schonbrunn Palace

Commoner and Schonbrunn

Commoner and Schonbrunn

Market Wine Seller (Even by the Glass)

Market Wine Seller (Even by the Glass)

Belvedere Palace

Belvedere Palace

Posted by MikeandKaren 12:43 Comments (1)

A Full Day of Culture

Tue - Sep 17

This was a perfect day for poor weather. Cloudy, drizzly, and cold. But we dressed for it and went off for a day of cultural sights.

First up, the Kunsthistorisches Museum, or as Rick Steves refers to it, the Kunsthistorywhateveritis Museum. We expected to spend some of the morning there, but this museum was just overflowing with great art. Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto, Caravaggio, Velazquez, Rubens, Vermeer, Durer, Bosch and the largest collection of Bruegel in the world (16th C answer to Norman Rockwell) and we loved all of his paintings.

The rooms are big, and one of the surprises was the sofa like seating in the room so that you could sit and lean back comfortably as you eyed the art. Some of the pieces were immense, some just large.

The museum opened at ten and we left a little after 12:30pm. We just lost track of the time.

So we stopped for a lunch break, mainly salads and soup and at 2pm headed over to the Opera for a tour. Their English tour starts at 2pm, and the line to buy tickets was out into the street. Umbrellas open for all. Inside we got tickets for our tour (they do different ones in 5 languages and even give discounts for us seniors). We sort of lucked out because even though we couldn't do a backstage tour we were able to see them setting the stage up for tonight's performance of Othello (they already had the outside seats set up for those stalwarts who would watch it on the TV screen outside).

If you've ever gone to a live opera you know that Supertitles are the thing, a display on an LED board that sits over the stage that shows an English translation of what the singers are saying. The problem is that if you are close in you have to crane your neck up, and if too far back then you may need binoculars. The Vienna opera instead places a small LED screen, about 12" across and 2" vertically, on the seat back in front of you and it's movable and can be tilted to your view.

The tour ended about 3:15pm and we headed over to the Albertina, the tip of the Hofburg Palace and then the Balcony of Empress Maria Theresa's daughter Maria Christina, who lived at this end of the palace. Among other things they had a great exhibition of Monet & Picasso works, and a few Chagall's, and other impressionists and post impressionists, in very large salons with great views and explanations of each in both German and English.

At 4:30pm we stopped at Cafe Schwarzenberg for our daily coffee break, a recommendation from a business contact who lived in Vienna. This cafe is a a very traditional Vienna cafe and has been around since 1861.

As we left for the hotel the sun came blazing out and the sky started showing lots of blue. Typical weather after your day is done. We can only hope it follows through tomorrow.

We got back to the hotel about 6pm, and decided not to go out for dinner. Instead we took advantage of the Hilton's Executive Lounge evening snacks. Roasted chicken pieces, Tagliatelli, breads, cheeses, liquor and wine. We then rolled back to the room to blog, watch some TV, and sleep. One beautiful sight, before we left the room, was just happening to look out and see the brightest rainbow arching across the sky over Vienna.

By the way, for those of you who watch Law & Order UK on the BBC channel, we were watching some British game show and who's the emcee but the chief detective on the series.

If you haven't noticed yet our days are simple to plan. Awake, eat, tour something, eat, tour again, eat, maybe another tour, rest, eat, sleep. Repeat.

So, tomorrow is our last full day, and maybe a few hours Thursday morning before we head to the airport. These past 17 days have flown.

For now, Auf Weidersehen

Entry to the Koontz

Entry to the Koontz


The Koontz Cafe

The Koontz Cafe


Interior of a Salon

Interior of a Salon


Bruegel's Tower of Babel

Bruegel's Tower of Babel


Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall


Another Yummy Viennese Torte

Another Yummy Viennese Torte


Cafe Schwatzenberg (Can you find Karen)

Cafe Schwatzenberg (Can you find Karen)

Posted by MikeandKaren 11:48 Comments (2)

Vienna, Habsburg Apartments & Empress Elizabeth 'Sisi'

Mon - Sep 15

Mike's s had a cold since Sunday so he's got a continuing runny nose and cough, but he's better than yesterday, so we'll carry on.

Breakfast at the Hilton was good. Eggs, sausages, breads, cheeses, fresh fruits, cereal, and one of those machines that makes 8 different kinds of coffee and knows if you had a small cup or a mug under the spout. Good start.

We were out quick. The sky is cloudy with open patches, but a bit of a breeze, so we went back and got jackets and umbrellas. Good choice as it drizzled for 5 minutes as we were walking. But then it changed. The sun came out and we could walk around in short sleeved shirts.

Vienna is a beautiful city with great architecture and easy to get around public transportation. The subway system is very easy and we have certainly taken advantage of it these past 2 days. The Hilton is in a great location, only a block from the U-bahn and easy walking distance to the city center attractions.

First stop was the Sisi Museum and then the Hofburg Imperial Apartments. Emperor Franz Josef I and his Empress, Elizabeth, known as Sisi, lived here. She was assassinated in 1898 at 61. They married when she was 16. The exhibits traced her life and did a thorough job in providing an understanding of it. She was the equivalent of Princess Diana in her day; very beautiful and disliked the public life. The apartments were lavish and left no doubt as to the benefits of having a lot of money, or access to it. Just the silver and gold plated cutlery service, with implements for 50+, and the 1,000 piece porcelain and silver and gold services, left no doubt how much money, and gifts, flowed into the Habsburgs.

We took a short lunch break at Aida, a well known coffee shop, of which there seem to be hundreds in Vienna, for some coffee, Sacher torte and an Apricot torte.

Then to the Treasury (we'll do the Art Museum tomorrow). If the apartments were opulent then the treasury, which contained all of the royal regalia going back to the 8th century, was King Midas on steroids.

We even stopped in an Apotheke to pick up something for Mike's cold.

Stopped for souvenirs at a Gustav Klimt shop, he's a well know Austrian artist, and picked up some things with his artwork on them, including a nice eyeglass case.

On the way back to the hotel we stopped and made reservations at the highly recommended Plachutta, known for its steaks, though it serves other foods. They had a table for us at 6:30pm on their enclosed patio with heaters, but told us we could not keep it beyond 8:00pm as they had other reservations set for it.

Karen opted for the Filet Beef Tips in a herb cream sauce and Mike for their specialty, Tafelspitz, basically boiled beef. They have a full page of options on their menu, and you can pick which cut of beef you want them to prepare. They even have a picture of a steer with the cuts labeled. Mike ordered their 'Grosse' option, which is for people who can't make up their minds, and offers three different cuts. All the selections come with a beef soup with root vegetables, in which the beef was cooked, a marrow bone, and marrow, which you eat on two slices of dark bread, a saucepan sized portion of thick hash brown type fried potatoes with onion, and two sauces, a sour cream with chives, and an applesauce with horseradish, and wine. You don't serve yourself since as soon as you try the waiter is at your side dishing out what you want. And, on top of that, the waiter asked if this was my first time eating there and, when I said yes, he pulled out a small instruction card that explained exactly how to deal with the many dishes that comprise the meal. Everything comes in its own copper pot, with its own serving spoon and fork, and all of the pots sit on heated metal plates that the waiter warns you not to touch because they are so hot. Most everyone who comes here orders one of the meat dishes. This was a good meal, but there is nothing that compares to a grilled Tenderloin or Prime Rib or a Texas T-Bone or similar thick and juicy steak.

Typical of Vienna, or at least our experience the past few days, we left with the sun showing, even if it was getting late, mild temperatures and no breeze. We left the restaurant with drizzle, and much cooler temperatures.

We got back about 8:30pm, too stuffed for any after dinner coffee and cake and worked on the blog.

It is hard to believe that there are just two days left here.

Graben Street

Graben Street

Karntnerstrasse

Karntnerstrasse

Crown of 1st Holy Roman Emperor circa 990

Crown of 1st Holy Roman Emperor circa 990

Dinner at Pluchetta

Dinner at Pluchetta

Posted by MikeandKaren 12:28 Comments (3)

Vienna

Sun - Sep 15

First, before we start the day, an observation. When we do 80mph, down the 35 extension loop, it feels like 80mph. But somehow kilometers don't feel as fast. At 130 to 135 kph, 78 - 81, we get passed of course, but it also feels slower. Our car, a Ford C-Max, has a really efficient engine, we're getting about 34 mpg, and has never shown any sign of strain going up hills nor zipping along the autobahn.

So, we woke early, this time me at normal 6:30, but Karen at 7 as we had to get the car returned by noon in Vienna when the office closed. Good breakfast, but no dilly dallying.

So we exit the village onto the B3 and there are 100 people unloading water bottles, setting up tables, etc, all along the roadside. A cop stops us and says we can't go left or right because there is a marathon that started along that road and all traffic is blocked or detoured. We have two choices. So back out some back roads and spend at least 1/2 hour plus getting over some mountains, or cross the road to the ferry station and take the ferry across the Danube to the other side where we can pick up the road towards Krems to get the autobahn to Vienna.

No choice really, but we lucked out in that we were number 4 in the car line, it was 8:30, and the ferry's first trip of the day was at 9am. But he saw he had a full line of cars so he started loading and we cast off at 8:50. First, this is a small ferry and only holds 7 cars, if they're all small. We were 4th in and parked at the far left against the front railings. This only means that when they unload the guys right in front get off first, then the three guys in back, then us. But it really wasn't as bad as we imagined. We were on the road at 9 and made good time arriving at the Hilton at 10:15am.

We dropped our bags as the room wasn't ready yet, but they said when we came back they'd have them in our room. It's good having a working wife who frequents Hilton. Executive floor, Executive breakfast, afternoon snacks in the lounge and free water and chocolates in the room, and free Internet (forget that most all of our other hotels also provided free breakfasts and Internet. But this Internet connection is like FIOS.

Helga got us to the Avis return, then a short bus from there to the Bahn station and a short train ride and we were on the go again. We bought a 72 hour ticket and just from the usage today the rest of our train rides are free.

We took a short lunch break, simple, just some Chicken Schnitzel and Fries and drinks.

We followed Rick Steve's walking tour of the major sights, including the Opera house. There was a performance on this afternoon and the opera has erected a giant LED screen on a plaza to one side of the opera with loudspeakers arranged behind and to the sides. They also have set up seating, for about 150+ people, though standing room is unlimited. So we stood at the rear sitting on some high planter boxes and watched Carmen, or at least it was excerpts from it. They do this on a regular basis for almost all of their performances. Really cool.

By the way, weather here was cloudy with bright spots, but no rain and temperatures running about 68F, very comfortable to walk around and we were back to short sleeves.

We walked the city, including Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral (1300-1450), and especially the immense pedestrian street there, the first in Europe, and then, for a really poor man's tour got on the tram, also free with the 72 hour ticket, and rode the Ring that circles the city, changing just once to continue the other half of the ring. There's a good writeup of what to look out for and which stops it comes after, and sometimes you have to be quick, but it covers a lot of ground and you can then go back to see anything that really struck your interest.

A quick stop at the Spanish Riding School, just to look, as there were no performances, and a break for drinks in their cafe terrace.

Back on the tram for a few stops to put us close to the Stadtpark and a short walk to the hotel. Unpacked, organized and rested until 6. Then it was time to get out and find someplace to eat. We took the train back to St. Stephen's area and found a nice Italian place just off the the immense pedestrian street to eat. Karen a Lasagna and Mike a fish filet with vegetables and potatoes, a shared salad, billed as small, but more than enough for two, wine, water, and bread. That was it for eating, though we then walked around scoping out some of the recommended restaurants we had read about or been advised to try. One thing that is amazing is just how many pastry shops there are here and the array of ways to make cakes and cookies. It's not easy watching calories, even if you wanted too.

Karlskirche

Karlskirche

Opera House

Opera House

Outside Opera Screen

Outside Opera Screen

St. Stephens

St. Stephens


Hofburg Palace

Hofburg Palace

Graben Strasse Night Scene

Graben Strasse Night Scene

Posted by MikeandKaren 12:17 Comments (0)

Hallstatt to Melk, Durnstein & Weissenkirchen

Sat - Sep 14

Up at our normal 6:30. Sky still cloudy, but no rain, and occasional open spots where the light shines through, but by 9am it's obvious there won't be sun soon enough so we're off to Melk in the Wachau Valley , about 2-1/2 hours away, to see the Abbey.

The Melk Abbey is one of Europe's great sights. It was established as a Benedictine Abbey in the 11th century, and rebuilt in the 18th after a fire destroyed it. It's a Baroque structure now, the restoration financed partly by the sale of the Abbey's Guttenberg Bible to Yale. The restoration was completed in 1996 to celebrate the 1,000th anniversary of the first mention of a country named Austria.

One of the most impressive rooms is the Library. This is a large room covered floor to ceiling and on all the walls, with shelves full of books. The monks were the elite of their time.

We had a small snack at the garden, and then left for Durnstein, a small charming village along the Danube.

Durnstein is built on a hill, with a historic church (which one doesn't have a historic church!), ruins that were the castle where Richard the Lion Hearted was imprisoned in 1193, and ramparts that also overlook the Danube. On top of all this are the old town walls that used to protect its inhabitants, though they are only viewable in spots.

As with all the villages along the Danube in the Wachau Valley, there are vineyards and wine producers everywhere, and everyone is selling Schnaps, wines and marmalades, and the ubiquitous Apricot jams and drinks.

After Durnstein we left for our final stop, Weissenkirchen a small village just 3 km from Durnstein . We had asked for a suite at the hotel and on arrival the proprietress told us their suite, actually they have one, is in its own building, near and overlooking the Danube. It is more like a small apartment that sits in a building that houses an antiques dealer's place and which they have rented for the season. An unusual layout fits in bedroom and dining room in one large room, kitchen in another with the shower and sink at a far end, and the bathroom and another sink in another room. There are views out two sides, both to the Danube. It also came with its own private patio and parking space.

We went out then and walked the village. For a small village this place has tons of restaurants and hotels, indicative of its location in a very tourist bound area. It's just a few kilometers from both Melk and Durnstein, and even Krems up from Durnstein, so the area can use all the hotels it can fit in. One thing we've noticed all over the area are the number of people riding bikes! They are everywhere and this area is great for biking.

We ate dinner on a terrace overlooking a vineyard. Mike, as usual, fish, a grilled Pike with potatoes and vegetables and a small salad, and Karen a Pork Loin with a cream sauce, with green beans and potato croquettes. Two different wines from the area, suggested by the waiter, and finally coffee and an apricot cake. Apricots are a staple of the area.

Then back to get ready for tomorrow, repack stuff we won't need on the trip into Vienna, and work on the blog. There is no Internet at the suite so we'll go to the main hotel after we've written it up to upload. The weather turned very warm with mixture of clouds and sun in the afternoon. Looks like we'll need our short sleeve tops again when we get to Vienna tomorrow.

As it turned out the hotel was closed! when I went to upload so you're seeing this on Sunday from the Hilton Vienna.

More later when we end Sunday's story.

Melk Abbey and Courtyard

Melk Abbey and Courtyard

Melk Abbey

Melk Abbey

Melk Abbey

Melk Abbey

Karen and Danube at Durnstein

Karen and Danube at Durnstein

Durnstein Church

Durnstein Church

Entry to Durnstein

Entry to Durnstein

Our Apartment and Terrace in Weissenkirchen

Our Apartment and Terrace in Weissenkirchen

Dinner Outlook

Dinner Outlook

9760275294_8b105cc47f.jpg

Posted by MikeandKaren 08:07 Comments (0)

Hallstatt

Fri - Sep 13

The forecast for Salzburg for the next week is cool with periods of rain and this morning it was cloudy with light rain and cool (about 50).

Last night's concert was just OK. While the main attraction, Eine Kliene Nacht Musik was good, the remaining three pieces, and their 1 1/2 hours with break, showed that even geniuses like Mozart have their low moments.

But the Mirabelle Palace, and the room the musicians played in was a fine example of the grandeur of the 1600's and 1700's. It was built in 1606 and restored after a fire in 1710.

We had gotten to it a bit early and found a small Italian bar a short distance away for some coffee's and to while away some time.

Back about 10:30 to wrap up packing and then to bed.

Up early again, though it's a light day with just a drive to Hallstatt and a stop along the way. The weather remains rainy and cloudy (thought no downpours or wind thank goodness), and it extends down to Hallstatt, our final stop today.

Our first stop is Bad Ischl and the road down to it is again beautiful. The drive takes us along two lakes with mountains along both sides of the road. Bad Ischl is a typical small town and there is a market day when we arrive. Parking though is easy as we find an underground lot that is basically empty. It also has green and red lights over each parking space as you drive in it making it easy to find an empty space.

We got a map from the TI and wandered about an hour and then left for Hallstatt, about a half hour away. Entry to the town is through a tunnel they cut in the mountain. There's little parking except in three lots, and two of them were full when we arrived, but our hotel has its own space and there were no cars when we arrived. This is a small hotel, family run, and we could see the owner in her kitchen, which is fairly large, preparing various things for tonights meal as they run a restaurant in the hotel too. Internet service, fast, a balcony for our room overlooking the mountain, computer for anyone without one, everything you would expect in a much larger hotel. About that car stuff, there is no driving in town. Everything is in walking distance. In fact, most people get here by train, the station in across the lake, and they take a boat ride across the lake to get to the town.

It was rainy and cloudy, and even though we would have preferred sun, the place is breathtaking. The low clouds that hang in the valleys and off the water add a nice atmosphere to the place. It's cool too, about 52F.

We stopped for a brief coffee and cake around 1 pm and met some other travelers from Ohio, talked a while, and then headed out to sightsee. There are beautiful homes hugging the lake, picturesque views at every turn and a huge waterfall in the town that feeds the lake.

The town was a salt mining center and even now has a mine nearby, and there was a museum, very modern in its displays, all high tech, 3-D videos, realistic displays, etc, that cover the town and the area's development from 2,000 BC to now. There was an excellent Catholic Church as well as a 'Bone Chapel', that contains over 1200 painted skulls. This is one of kind chapel in the world. Due to limited room in the cemetery bones were dug up after 12 years to make room for the freshly dead. The skulls were painted and dated. They stopped the practice in the 1960's when the Catholic Church began permitting cremation; however one woman who died in 1983 managed to get her skull added. Their other bones, mostly legs and arms, were stacked like cord wood under the table like shelves where their skulls were.

We walked about until near 5, shopped a bit for souvenirs, and then headed back to the room to rest up for dinner. We found a very nice upscale hotel and restaurant and made a reservation for 6:30 for a table on the window overlooking the lake.

Dinner was superb. Classy dining room and the window seat was perfect. For Karen a Chicken Breast, pounded and crusted with ground pumpkin seed and warm potato salad with red onions. For Mike, another whole roasted Trout, with Rosemary potatoes and a salad, a nice Riesling for two, then coffees with a mix of ice creams for Karen and a wild berry strudel for Mike.

By 8 we were no longer hungry and left for a short walk back to the hotel.

Tomorrow is forecast sunnier, though with some clouds, and about 61. So we're hoping to get some pictures of this gorgeous town with some sun and then start our 2 1/2 drive to Melk.

Auf Weidersehen.

Hallstatt Market Square

Hallstatt Market Square

Skulls in Bone Chapel

Skulls in Bone Chapel

Hallstatt Church and Mountain View

Hallstatt Church and Mountain View

Hallstatt Lake View

Hallstatt Lake View

Posted by MikeandKaren 12:33 Comments (1)

The Salt Mines and Culture

Thur - Sep 12

Woke to a cloudy sky and light rain, but we still have things to do. So, off to the Salt Mines. Really. The mine is near the town of Hallein. The rain got a little harder as we drove, and we had to disagree with Helga once when she wanted to put us on what appeared to be some back road, so we followed the posted signs to the mine instead.

The mine was interesting and fun. You put on these sturdy overalls and jacket then hop on a train, which is really a bench seat about a foot wide and 15 feet long on a small rail car, which seats about 8 people in a long row. There are about 3 of these 'cars'. The train then goes down a track through a long tunnel, about a mile or so. The outfit, which includes a hood, is to keep you warm as well as protect your clothes and backside. More on that later. The tunnel temperature runs a constant 52 degrees or so.

You then walk and stop and walk some more, at one point over 800 meters, listening to a very good explanation of the mine, its history, and the importance of salt, the 'Salz' in Salzburg, and how it provided the wealth for the city and it's masters.

There is a boat ride too across an underground lake. Then another 800 meter walk through some old caves. To get down some of the caves, too steep to walk, you ride a bannister. Really. The bannister is about a foot wide, with a grove in the middle and is very smooth. This is the other reason you wear the pants, else, if you were wearing shorts or a mini skirt your cheeks, both top and bottom, would be red and or blistered. The ride down is almost like a Luge ride. You do this twice during the visit. The mine trip is 300 to 400 feet underground. The final exit though is up a very long escalator.

The total visit runs two hours. While we were waiting for our tour number to pop up on the monitor the sun broke through, though the clouds were still thick, but that didn't last long as when we exited there was just more clouds and light rain.

Going back to Salzburg we decided to follow Helga. She must love finding the shortest routes. We followed a one car wide road for about 5 kilometers through the woods and, on the good side, some very scenic views and remote farm country. Every 50 meters or so, whether on a hill or flat ground, there are pullouts and everyone can see at least that far ahead so they know whether to pull over while someone is coming. This though would not be so much fun in January with heavy snow covering the road's shoulders. We made it back in 30 minutes.

We dropped what we didn't need in the room and then headed out, in the rain, with umbrellas, to find some lunch and then went to the Salzburg Museum.

They had a very good exhibit of Middle Ages paintings and religious works as well as one of the history of Salzburg up to modern times. The museum was fairly modern inside and even the bathrooms looked like they had an architect design them. For example, there were no doors to pull open to go in, just a sliding smoked glass door built in to the wall that opened into the room. They did though have doors on the stalls. Very unusual and fitting with the overall modernness.

When we were ready to leave the rain had stopped to a light drizzle and we headed back to the room to begin packing and rest. We leave early tomorrow, and we have a concert tonight at 8pm, so we don't want to leave the packing until later. That is also why this will be an early blog post as there won't be any pictures to add later and we'll update you all on the concert tomorrow.

So, tell you more then,

Auf Wiedersehen.

Dressed for the Mines

Dressed for the Mines

The Train Down

The Train Down

The Train - Piggyback Style

The Train - Piggyback Style

Bannister Slide

Bannister Slide


Helga's Scenic View

Helga's Scenic View

Posted by MikeandKaren 09:18 Comments (2)

Berchtesgaden and Konigsee

Wed - Sep 11

At 6:30 there were clouds and blue sky and some tinges of sun but by 8 the sky was covered, about what was forecast, mostly cloudy, 64.

We left for Berchtesgaden, really Obersalzberg, and the site of the Documentation Center on Hitler's Third Reich and his Eagle's Nest chalet.

The drive was easy and only 45 minutes and though mostly cloudy enough sun peeked through that we were sure we'd have no rain and little cloud cover to prevent us from seeing the view from his aerie.

The Documentation Center is thorough to say the least and certainly a must for WW II history buffs. We spent 2 hours there following the rise and fall of Hitler and his henchmen. There was also a short film with interviews by various farmers who had their land taken away from them so that Hitler could build his compound and those that resisted went to Dachau. An excellent audio guide was included as well as written leaflets. The Allies bombed the compound at the end of the war but the underground bunkers were intact. The Documentation Center museum was built in 1996 on top of the bunkers. There are 4 miles of bunkers but we only walked a short ways since they all looked the same.

No cars are allowed on the Eagles Nest site, which is now a restaurant. You buy a bus ticket and busses take you on the four mile drive up to the mountain top (6000 ft high), which takes about 15 minutes. The entire time the busses, big tour size, are on a one lane road, hugging the edge of the road, with stupendous views. They are timed such that at the halfway point, when the previous busses are returning from the top, the upward or downward busses pull into a small area to allow the other busses to pass. At the top you reserve your return time so that they can ensure you will have a seat.

At the top you take an elevator the final 400 feet or so up in an elevator that holds 25 or 30 people.

Then you are almost at with even more stupendous views. There is still a few hundred more feet of rugged climbing and walking to get even higher.

The views were great and then we stopped for coffee and cake. We allowed 90 minutes until we'd get our bus down and it was plenty. Best of all the weather played nice, the sun shone through the clouds, the temperature stayed cool and not cold, and even though there were some clouds and mist descending we managed to avoid it before our trip back down.

When we got down we took a short drive through Berchtesgaden to Konigssee, a beautiful tranquil lake surrounded by mountains and from which we saw at the top of the Eagles Nest, on which electric powered boats ply the waters from one end to the other.

We went to the halfway point, to a stop called St. Bartholome where there is an old church and buildings as well as trails that go around a peninsula with Great Lake views.

After the boat ride back to Konigsee, we stopped for dinner, trout again for Mike and a Turkey Breast for Karen.

The drive back was easy, though it had gotten much darker and rained slightly, but Helga got us back easily. We stopped in the hotel bar for some coffee and cake before returning to our room.

All in all a really great day.

View from Lower Section of Eagles Nest

View from Lower Section of Eagles Nest

View of Konigssee

View of Konigssee

View of St. Bartholome

View of St. Bartholome

Cute Dinner Fraulein in Traditional Dress

Cute Dinner Fraulein in Traditional Dress


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Posted by MikeandKaren 12:26 Comments (0)

The Sound of Music Day

Tue - Sep10

Early rise today, 6:30, as our tour pickup is at 8:45. Our hotel, just a few blocks from the river Salzach and Mozartplatz, was a great find. Their breakfast deserves a menu of its own, and having your eggs done as you like them is a nice touch.

Although we almost never book tours, especially bus tours, the 'Sound of Music' tour received a very good review and was assuredly not touristy or 'kitchy'. As it turned out there was just us and another couple from Roanoke, VA in the van which normally held 8 and we ended up in front.

The tour runs around the main square with the driver, a young guy and very knowledgeable, explaining not just the locations pertinent to the movie, but a history of Salzburg and Austria and the significance of the various buildings and churches.

We then left center Salzburg and headed out to various locations, such as the house used for the von Trapp family home, a gazebo in a park that was built for the movie and later donated to the city park, some funny stories, like the actresses who played the nuns resting between takes with their habits pulled up over their knees, causing all sorts of questions by the locals. But all of which he then followed by explanations of the reality of the time and the real issues they faced.

The tour proceeded miles outside of Salzburg, into farming country and through some small villages, many where, which we'd seen already in our driving about, there were cords upon cords of wood stacked outside the houses. Most of them use the wood for heating, some have no electric stoves and thus use wood for cooking too.

We stopped at a very scenic lake for a coffee and cake break. It was tough picking a dessert but we settled on a plum cake and Sacher Torte, which was better than the original variety we had in Innsbruck.

We also stopped along the way at a Luge ride to try our hand at it. It was actually easier than it looked, we both rode the same luge, and were able to get to the bottom fast, but without crashing or tipping over on the way down. We put our names in for the Winter Olympics US Luge team:).

Eventually we made our way back to the city via the Autobahn and were done at 1:15pm.

We didn't mention this the other day but the Autobahn mostly has a speed limit of 130kph, about 78mph. Karen, our lead foot driver, keeps it about 140. But, even at that speed, we were being passed on a regular basis. Our guide today noted that there are radar installations along the road which allow a 5% variation and take your picture as you pass if you're exceeding that. So she'll have to be less aggressive from now on and hopefully didn't trip the radar and get a ticket in the mail :)

Drop off was at the Mirabelle Gardens, a large park in the city center with artistic flower designs and statuary. Here too is the Mirabelle Palace where we have tickets for a Mozart concert on Thursday evening.

We walked the very old Steingasse street, once the start of the only road in the Middle Ages going South to Venice. This street is now a trendy place for bar hopping but we also spotted a recommended restaurant, called Shrimps, where we decided to eat tonight. In spite of the name their menu also includes selections for Karen.

We walked through the old town some more, especially Getreidegasse, the main pedestrian shopping street and the Old Market square and about 3 headed back to the hotel to take a break, drop some stuff we don't need, and rest up before dinner. We returned to the hotel about 8:00pm having walked in the rain (really drizzle) to and from restaurant. It was a little fun walking in the rain and getting into the atmosphere of the place. The restaurant was a great find and it was full of locals (with only 20 seats in the place plus a small bar). It's really strange to be walking into a place that is so old on the outside and very contemporary on the inside.

Auf Weidersehen

Von Trapp Family House and Fortress from Sound of Music

Von Trapp Family House and Fortress from Sound of Music

View from Luge Ride Descent

View from Luge Ride Descent

Luge Captain on Sled

Luge Captain on Sled

Wolfgangsee View over Town

Wolfgangsee View over Town

Church from Sound of Music

Church from Sound of Music

Mirabelle Gardens and Fortress View

Mirabelle Gardens and Fortress View

Snack Break

Snack Break

Posted by MikeandKaren 11:27 Comments (6)

Salzburg

Mon - Sep 9

Mon - Sep 9

Our normal wakeup is 7. It rained overnight and the morning is gray and cool, but not raining. The clouds hang half way down the mountain, but you can see them as clumps rather than an overall blanket. Mists are all over the real lower grounds. But there are lighter clouds visible through the dark lower ones which sort of promise breaks and maybe clearing later. We'll see. Most of the early day is driving to Salzburg, about three hours.

Forgot to note the other day, diesel fuel, which we're using, runs about $7 a gallon.

Helga got us to Salzburg with but one wrong turn in the city since she wanted us to go down a one-way street, but we quickly found another route and arrived at hotel by 12:30. Hotel is beautiful and we have another suite that overlooks the garden. They have a spa and fitness center here too although we won't need to use the fitness center as we are getting a great work out each day walking at least 5 to 7 miles we suspect plus many steps.

We dropped our bags and immediately took off for the old center (about a 6 minute walk from our hotel). We stopped for a quick lunch and then started the Rick Steves walking tour, taking in the area around Mozartplatz, Residenzplatz, Kapitelplatz, Universitatsplatz, which included the beautiful Salzburg Cathedral, St. Peter's Cemetery (where ground is rented and if family members don't pay the annual fee, your remains are chucked), and the Festival Hall where Captain Von Trapp nervously waited before he sang Edelweiss. We strolled down the famous Getreidegasse where it's lined with jewelry shops.

We took the tram to the top of the hill to see the Hohensalzburg Fortress, which was built over 1000 yrs ago. It has a great museum inside and great views over the city.

The sun came out blazing around 5pm and we stopped for a quick dinner at an outside cafe, walked a bit more to make room for some coffee and cake, after which we strolled some more, took more pictures and called it a night around 7:30.

Auf Weidersehen

Fortress View of Salsburg

Fortress View of Salsburg

Getreidegasse Shopping Street Store Signs

Getreidegasse Shopping Street Store Signs

Dinner Stop

Dinner Stop

Cathedral

Cathedral

Fortress

Fortress

Enough Church Domes and Spires?

Enough Church Domes and Spires?

Posted by MikeandKaren 11:39 Comments (2)

Innsbruck & Hall

Sun - Sep 8

Sun - Sep 8

In the morning, about 7, there were clouds to the South, but East, or at least as you view the mountain, the sun, on the other side, was hitting the peaks and there was plenty of blue sky. After breakfast we were out at 9:30.

We were not sure we could spend a lot of time in Innsbruck but we were wrong. Our first worry on the drive in was that we didn't really pay attention to Helga and before long we were on the Austrian A12, their Autobahn, for which you need to have a 'vignette', a card you buy to stick on your windshield which is how they avoid toll necessities. But we were only on it for 8 kilometers and no polizei were patrolling. Being Sunday made the travel into town easy. We quickly found parking and were off to explore the old town.

It's a beautiful gothic old center unlike the German towns we've visited recently which are mainly baroque. We saw all the main attractions including the Golden Roof, which was built by Emperor Maximilian I in 1494. We climbed the city tower with 148 steps and saw a great view of Innsbruck. We also saw some beautiful churches, one of them containing 28 statues of Max's favorite family members and heros including King Arthur. We then strolled the Maria-Theresien Strasse to check out their Triumphal Arch, which was built to commemorate Maria Therese son Leopold who partied a little too hard after his wedding night and died the next day.

We took a short lunch break at the Cafe Sacher, an outpost of its famous original in Vienna. we both had the torte with whipped cream and coffees

We then went to the Ski Jump Stadium and took the tram to the top to see where the skiers take off. We also saw the Olympic Rings and cauldron where the 1964 and 1976 Olympics were held. There is a plaque with all the names of the gold, silver and bronze medal winners including Dorothy Hamill.

After walking around here, we then drove to the small town of Hall in Tirol, another quaint charming town but this time it was built on a hill and it reminded us of those cute villages we see in France and Italy. Given that it's Sunday, not too many shops open except for those tourist shops with all the cheap souvenirs. We wandered around there for about an hour and left for Mittenwald about 4pm. This was another warm day with patches of sun and clouds.

One thing about driving in this area, besides going back and forth between Germany and Austria is the mountainous terrain. Everywhere you lookthere's another peak above you, and always patches on still unmelted snow.

For dinner we chose a Trip Advisor recommended restaurant called Mama Lucia Italian Ristorante. It was great, beautiful inside with great food and atmosphere.

Another great day has ended. We have a long drive tomorrow, about 3 hrs to Salzburg. It's supposed to rain tomorrow, but we'll see; hope their forecasters aren't any better than ours.

Auf Wiedersehen

View of Innsbruck Main Square from Clock Tower

View of Innsbruck Main Square from Clock Tower

Domes of St. Jacob

Domes of St. Jacob

Lunch - Original Sacher Tortes

Lunch - Original Sacher Tortes

Olympic Ski Jump

Olympic Ski Jump

Olympic Rings

Olympic Rings

Hall in Tyrol - Street View

Hall in Tyrol - Street View

Posted by MikeandKaren 11:48 Comments (1)

Castles (Catch-Up) & The Zugspitze

Fri/Sat - Sep 6/7

First a note. I'm putting two days in this post and we limited pictures as there is no FIOS here and jps uploads take a while.

Fri - Sep 6

Today will be busy so we're up at 6:20. The hotel breakfast is a feast and comes with the room unlike the Hilton in Munich. Then we left at 8 for the first castle of the day.

Hohenschwangau had existed since the 11th century and King Ludwig II's father, Maximilliam II, had bought it. Ludwig grew up here and later built Neuschwanstein after he became King at 18. Unfortunately by the time he occupied it he was 40 and only lived in it for 172 days and died shortly thereafter. He was found dead in a lake with his doctor after he was declared mentally unfit. That death to this day was considered suspicious.

Ludwig was a hermit, lived at night, never married, in fact ended an engagement after eight months, and dined alone not wanting to see anyone. He had an obsession with the French royalty, and even built another castle, Linderhof, a small imitation of Versailles.On the grounds of that castle, and because of his equal obsession with Richard Wagner, he also built a private grotto where he could watch performances of his operas by himself. More on that later.

Thus he was known as Mad King Ludwig. Enough history, you can Google more.

In comparison, and why you visit Hohenschwangau first, Neuschwanstein is over the top a jewel. It's what Cinderella's Castle is modeled after.

We arrived early enough for our 9:50 reservation so we had plenty of time to spend walking by the Alpensee lake, a tranquil place surrounded by mountains and a walking path around it, and then to visit the museum. The museum is a small building filled with history and artifacts from Ludwig and his family's life. We needed all the time available to see it.

A ten minute climb then got us to the castle where you wait, with a lot of other people, for your time and tour number to pop up on the TV monitor. They are very organized and automated in the tour business.

The tour took about 30 minutes. The interior was 'normal', other than the period paintings and furniture, and looked like a home one would live in. This is not to minimize its impressiveness, just that it felt like real people would live there.

Then we took a short walk downhill into the center where we got a bus that took you up to Marienbrucke, the bridge that spans a chasm and overlooks Neuschwanstein.

As much as Karen does not like heights, and this bridge is only about 8 or 10 feet wide with only a metal fence-like shield that rises to your chest leaving you with a sense of nothing between you and the castle a few hundred feet away, she ventured onto it and found it to be 'enjoyable' anyway. Besides, the view is incredible as you'll see in the pictures.

A short walk down then to the castle, again a short wait for the monitor to announce our time, and our tour started. All our tours were scheduled in English.

The interior of this castle is so over the top that had you seen it first you might have walked out on the Hohenschwangau tour. Room after room with impressive wood carvings, painted walls and ceilings, furniture, and all as though money was never an object, which it wasn't since he ended up pretty much in debt by the time he died. To really appreciate the interior I suggest you Google a bit and see it with your own eyes.

We had a brief cake break at the castle and then a horse drawn carriage ride down to the bottom where we had parked.

Next stop Oberammergau. There being no Passion play for us to see, ha, we walked through the town. It's also known for its fine wood carvers and there was certainly no end to shops selling the stuff. We were struck though by the honesty of them all when they had posted signs in various areas of the shop noting which were real wood and which not. The town is charming with painted building facades. About 90 minutes later we had seen all there was and left.

Next stop Linderhof castle, though not really a castle, more like a jewel of a two story music box, standing all white among the green grass and trees and with a fountain and water park directly in front of it that rose along the ground at least two hundred feet away and and upward about 50 feet high.

Ludwig had a thing for France, specifically French royalty and Louis IV, and counted some as his friends. He wanted to live in a fantasy world that Versailles brought to mind. So he copied many of the rooms not exactly as the originals but 'sort of as seen in versailles'. He didn't allow any pictures of himself in the castle because that would ruin the ability for him to think he was really living at Versailles. He also was a night person and in addition liked to eat in private. So, in his dining room, the dinner table was on a lift which enabled his servants to lower it to the kitchen for them to set the table for him and then lift it back up through the floor above for him to eat alone.

The rooms are outrageously Rococo and Baroque and his bedroom outdoes anything at Versailles.

He also was infatuated with Wagner. So much so that in a glen away from the castle he had built, under a hill, a grotto, which required a lot of steel and concrete. Entering it is like entering a cave, with high ceilings and an underground lake. It's also cold. So he had heaters installed to warm the air as well to heat the water. He had his own private box to then view the Wagner operas, for which he brought in orchestras and performers, just for himself! This was one truly dedicated madman.

By now it was 6pm so we decided to eat at the hotel on the Linderhof grounds.

Karen had pork tenderloins in a Chanterelle mushroom sauce with broccoli and mashed potatoes and Mike a filleted trout, roasted, with potatoes and root vegetables. Dinner was delicious. No dessert and there was a lot of food and it was starting to get late.

We left a bit after 7 and got back to Fussen a bit after 8. Beat a bit, with packing to do, but we were able to move some sights from later days which will free up time for Innsbruck other sites not on our original list

Sat - Sep 7

We slept a little later, 7am, had breakfast, loaded the car and went off to Austria and the Zugspite, the tallest mountain in Germany. We went to Austria because the gondola/tram up from there is faster, and cheaper, and more importantly quicker to get to than from the Germany side The views were stupendous. It was a beautiful clear day with no wind. We really didn't need our jackets but Karen wore her new down jacket just in case it was cold up there but she quickly was able to ditch it. We walked from the Austria terrace to the Germany terrace and watched the hikers ascend to the top of the peak. We spent about 2 hrs there enjoying the views.

Next stop was Garmisch Partenkirchen, a resort town of about 50,000 people but a very walkable old town center with more beautiful painted building facades. We stopped for lunch at an outdoor cafe and just enjoyed the beautiful day with great views of the town. We strolled around town, contemplated walking across town to the Philosopher's Way but it was a 30 min walk to get there plus a 90 min walk through the woods. We decided to skip it since we had our share of walking and climbing yesterday, which, by the way - we must have climbed over 1000 stairs before we were done for the day.

We headed to our destination for the next 2 nights - Mittenwald. It's another resort town, absolutely gorgeous with the Alps right at your doorstep. Our room is a large suite with a balcony that looks out on the Alps. This is another charming town full of shops, restaurants and beautifully painted facades. We walked the town for 2 hrs then stopped for dinner overlooking the pedestrian mall. At 7:30pm we called it a night so we could get back and spend some time updating the blog and washing out some clothes. So far, we've had 2 shower days. Today was a little cooler than yesterday, but still pretty warm in the sun. We are not complaining though since it's been gorgeous!

Hohenschwangau Castle

Hohenschwangau Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle

Oberammergau Facade

Oberammergau Facade

Linderhof Castle

Linderhof Castle

Zugspitze View

Zugspitze View

Garmisch

Garmisch

Mittenwald Room Terrace View

Mittenwald Room Terrace View

Posted by MikeandKaren 12:32 Comments (3)

Mad King Ludwig's Castles

Fri - Sep 6

First, this was a long day and we just got back 12 hours later. We went to Ludwig's Hohenschwangau, Neuschwanstein and Linderhof Castles, and to the Benedictine Ettal Monastery and the Passion Play and wood carving town of Obergammerau.

Had dinner at a hotel on the Linderhof grounds.

At any rate a very long day and we have an early start tomorrow.

So, no real blog tonight, nor pictures. But I promise you that tomorrow when you see the picture of Karen standing on a narrow bridge span at least 1,000 feet in the air with Castle Neuschwanstein in the background it will astound you.

More tomorrow.

Guten nacht!

Posted by MikeandKaren 11:44 Comments (0)

Wies & Fussen

Thurs - Sep 5

Thurs - Sep 5

Today we're off to Fussen after picking up the car. Actually Auto Europe appears to have reserved two cars for us,so says the Avis guy, so Karen drove one and me the other. Just kidding. Last I looked they only hit VISA once. Easy exit from the car pickup and it only took Helga 5 minutes to lock onto some satellites and we were on our way. We already knew we wanted to just do main roads so when she tried putting us on the shortcuts we persisted, shut her off, and did old fashioned map following until we got closer and then turned her back on. Women!

Wieskirche is in the town of Wies, the only attraction, but it's a World Heritage site and is the largest Baroque church in Germany. The setting is beautiful and the mountains around the area make for a great site.

We stopped there for lunch. Karen just had a salad because she wanted to leave room for dessert while Mike, glutton, had Hollzfaller, a pork dish, with great fried onions and potatoes and a salad. After that the dessert, a German specialty, a Bavarian Sopapilla.

Then off to Fussen and on the way we could see some of the castles we're set to visit tomorrow.

The weather is gorgeous but in the sun borders very warm to hot around 80.

Entry to Fussen is straight in from the main road and our hotel right at the end of it. A class operation with reserved parking with your name over the parking space. The room is large with a nice sitting area and a contemporary decor. Certainly beats the Hilton.

After dumping our bags, we took the Rick Steves walking tour, which took about 2 hrs. Fussen is mainly a tourist town, where people stay who will visit the Ludwig castles. It has a beautiful backdrop, with the Alps at your doorstep. We walked around and took in its two main churches, a monastery and a castle, plus a long pedestrian street loaded with clothing stores, tourist trinkets and cafes/restaurants.

We had dinner on the main drag at an outdoor cafe. It had cooled off nicely by the time we sat down and was bordering on getting chilly. After dinner and a little stroll around the town again, we returned to the room since we have an early morning wakeup due to our early reservations for the castles.

Guten Nacht for now.

Wieskirche Exterior

Wieskirche Exterior

Wieskirche Interior

Wieskirche Interior

Me

Me

Lunch

Lunch

Lech River And Countryside

Lech River And Countryside

Fussen Castle

Fussen Castle

Posted by MikeandKaren 11:29 Comments (3)

Dachau

Wed - Sep 4

Wed - Sep 4

Our usual morning start. Up at 8 and out at 9:30. Today though a quick coffee and cake at the hotel and then to the station for the train and then bus connection to Dachau. Total time to get there about an hour including waits and transfer times.

Dachau, the town, and the countryside belies what Dachau the camp brings to mind. Even after all these years the preservation works that's been done it is remarkable to see.

Generally unknown is that the camp, after the war, was used until the 60's because the numerous survivors had nowhere else to go. Until the 60's, with a lot of repair and rebuilding, the camp area was like a small town with cinemas, shops, etc..

The original camp's administration building has been turned into a museum and a theater where they show movies at various times and in different languages that document the camp and what the allies found when they liberated it. The museum itself, over 600 feet long and 50 feet wide is chock full of displays and descriptive information that covers the start of WWII to the end with pictures and interviews of survivors as well as the daily life in the camp. You can spend 2 hours or more just in the museum building. They've reconstructed two of the barracks out of 25 as they were then, and there are numerous monuments raised to groups of the various religions persecuted during the war years. Between an excellent audio guide, the museum, and ample descriptive plaques throughout the grounds you come away with a thorough understanding not of the camp but of the reasons behind the horror by the people who justified it to themselves. while there were both Crematoriums and Gas chambers in Dachau, only the crematoriums were used and then only until a coal shortage hit Germany and their use was restricted.

We finally finished, or at least felt bedraggled enough to stop about near 2pm for lunch. They had a good cafeteria type restaurant and while not a four-star Michelin Mike's Wiener Schnitzel was pretty good.

At 3pm we got the bus (which stops right in front) and got to the train in 7 minutes. The 3:10 would get us home at 3:40 but it got hung up with just three stops to go. Someone had had a heart attack, or something, and in falling had broken their neck and they were afraid to try to remove them from the car. So the train was stopped and we had to exit to another track and wait for the next Munich bound train. But it only took about 20 minutes and we got back to the hotel at 4pm.

Our original plan was to return to Munich and then go to either the Nymphenberg Palace or the Residenz to see the crown jewels, but there was just not enough time. So we rested a while at the hotel and decided to go out later for dinner.

By the way the weather has been great. Today was brilliant sun, no wind, and 77. So far all the forecasts are calling for similar weather at least for the next 14 days through Salzburg. Hope their weather guys are accurate.

At 6:30 we left the hotel to go back to Marienplatz for dinner at a place we saw earlier that served genuine German meals and was right on the square in front of the Rathaus called the Cafe Am Marienplatz.

Things work out strange because on the way out of the hotel we noticed they had really good maps of the Bahn system and the street layout in the main center. So we took one each wondering why they didn't give us them when we arrived.

First good omen. In the rush we got on the wrong train, which we noticed when the first stop was outside in the open air. Wong! Should still be underground. We quickly whipped out the new map, saw where we were, crossed over to the other track, and in two minutes got to Marienplatz.

Dinner was good. Karen wasn't that hungry so a salad and a pretzel was enough. Mike had a Schweinebraten, sort of a pork loin stewed a while, very tender, with fried potatoes and onions and sauerkraut in a dark beer sauce, a beer, and for both of us a chocolate cake and coffee for Mike. Good dinner and very filling.

Then down to theS-Bahn home. Wrong. After 10 minutes or so the announcement came that the trains were out. Of course since we don't understand German, it took us about 10 minutes to figure out that no trains would be coming since everyone was exiting the underground. So much for German efficiency! So, got to use the new and better street map and planned the way back on foot. Twenty minutes later we were back at the Hilton, a bit after 9pm.

All to do now is shower, pack, and blog away.

Tomorrow is Fussen, 133Km, about 90 minutes.

More tomorrow night guys.

Entry Gate to Camp

Entry Gate to Camp

Sculpture

Sculpture

Sculpture

Sculpture

Sculpture

Sculpture


Jewish Memorial

Jewish Memorial


Crematorium Ovens

Crematorium Ovens

Posted by MikeandKaren 13:25 Comments (1)

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